Vibration Prediction of Bladed Disks Coupled by Friction Joints

Malte Krack, Loic Salles, Fabrice Thouverez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

144 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The present review article addresses the vibration behavior of bladed disks encountered e.g. in aircraft engines as well as industrial gas and steam turbines. The utilization of the dissipative effects of dry friction in mechanical joints is a common means of the passive mitigation of structural vibrations caused by aeroelastic excitation mechanisms. The prediction of the vibration behavior is a scientific challenge due to (a) the strongly nonlinear contact interactions involving local sticking, sliding and liftoff, (b) the model order required to accurately describe the dynamic behavior of the assembly, and (c) the multi-disciplinary character of the problem associated with the need to account for structural mechanical as well as fluid dynamical effects. The purpose of this article is the overview and discussion the current state of the art of vibration prediction approaches. The modeling approaches in this work embrace the description of the rotating bladed disk, the contact modeling, the consideration of aeroelastic effects, appropriate model order reduction techniques and the exploitation of the rotationally periodic nature of the problem. The simulation approaches cover the direct computation of periodic, steady-state externally forced and self-excited vibrations using the high-order harmonic balance method, the formulation of the contact problem in the frequency domain, methods for the solution of the governing algebraic equations and advanced simulation approaches, including the concept of nonlinear modes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)589-636
Number of pages48
JournalArchives of Computational Methods in Engineering
Volume24
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2017
Externally publishedYes

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