Using conducting metallopolymers to fabricate metal nanoparticle/conducting polymer hybrids as electrocatalytic materials for fuel cell applications

Kate R. Edelman, Corinne A. Atkinson, Keith J. Stevenson, Bradley J. Holliday

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

Abstract

In fuel cells, the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is an important electrocatalytic process. Currently the process uses platinum, which is prohibitively expensive and in short supply. Alternatives which use abundant, inexpensive, and efficient electrocatalytic materials as substitutes for Pt-based oxygen cathodes must be found. Previous research shows this may be achieved by using multi-metallic systems where the different metals play a cooperative role. We have prepared conducting metallopolymers that will exploit the polymer as a charge carrier and the metal centers as seed points for metal nanoparticle growth that will then act as active electrocatalysts. These hybrid materials help create discrete size controlled nanoparticles over a large surface area. Various metal centers have been incorporated to analyze the individual performance of each metal center in the conducting polymer material for ORR. The synthesis, characterization, electrochemistry, and electrocatalysis will be discussed herein.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAmerican Chemical Society - 236th National Meeting and Exposition, Abstracts of Scientific Papers
Publication statusPublished - 2008
Externally publishedYes
Event236th National Meeting and Exposition of the American Chemical Society, ACS 2008 - Philadelpia, PA, United States
Duration: 17 Aug 200821 Aug 2008

Publication series

NameACS National Meeting Book of Abstracts
ISSN (Print)0065-7727

Conference

Conference236th National Meeting and Exposition of the American Chemical Society, ACS 2008
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityPhiladelpia, PA
Period17/08/0821/08/08

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