Sparse bump sonification: A new tool for multichannel EEG diagnosis of mental disorders; application to the detection of the early stage of Alzheimer's disease

François B. Vialatte, Andrzej Cichocki

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper investigates the use of sound and music as a means of representing and analyzing multichannel EEG recordings. Specific focus is given to applications in early detection and diagnosis of early stage of Alzheimer's disease. We propose here a novel approach based on multi channel sonification, with a time-frequency representation and sparsification process using bump modeling. The fundamental question explored in this paper is whether clinically valuable information, not available from the conventional graphical EEG representation, might become apparent through an audio representation. Preliminary evaluation of the obtained music score - by sample entropy, number of notes, and synchronous activity - incurs promising results.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationNeural Information Processing - 13th International Conference, ICONIP 2006, Proceedings
PublisherSpringer Verlag
Pages92-101
Number of pages10
ISBN (Print)3540464840, 9783540464846
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006
Externally publishedYes
Event13th International Conference on Neural Information Processing, ICONIP 2006 - Hong Kong, China
Duration: 3 Oct 20066 Oct 2006

Publication series

NameLecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)
Volume4234 LNCS - III
ISSN (Print)0302-9743
ISSN (Electronic)1611-3349

Conference

Conference13th International Conference on Neural Information Processing, ICONIP 2006
Country/TerritoryChina
CityHong Kong
Period3/10/066/10/06

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Sparse bump sonification: A new tool for multichannel EEG diagnosis of mental disorders; application to the detection of the early stage of Alzheimer's disease'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this