Sparse bump modeling of mildAD patients: Modeling transient oscillations in the EEG of patients with mild Alzheimer's disease

Francois Benoit Vialatte, Charles François Vincent Latchoumane, Nigel Hudson, Sunil Wimalaratna, Jordi Solé-Casals, Jaeseung Jeong, Andrzej Cichocki

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

We explore the potential of bump modeling to extract transient local synchrony in EEG, as a marker for mildAD (mild Alzheimer's disease). EEG signals of patients with mildAD are transformed to a wavelet time-frequency representation, and afterwards a sparsification process (bump modeling) extracts time-frequency oscillatory bursts. We observed that organized oscillatory events contain stronger discriminative signatures than averaged spectral EEG statistics for patients in a probable early stage of Alzheimer's disease. Specifically, bump modeling enhanced the difference between mildAD patients and age-matched control subjects in the θ and β frequency ranges. This effect is consistent with previous results obtained on other databases.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationBIOSIGNALS 2010 - Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Bio-inpsired Systems and Signal Processing
Pages479-484
Number of pages6
Publication statusPublished - 2010
Externally publishedYes
Event3rd International Conference on Bio-inspired Systems and Signal Processing, BIOSIGNALS 2010 - Valencia, Spain
Duration: 20 Jan 201023 Jan 2010

Publication series

NameBIOSIGNALS 2010 - Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Bio-inpsired Systems and Signal Processing, Proceedings

Conference

Conference3rd International Conference on Bio-inspired Systems and Signal Processing, BIOSIGNALS 2010
Country/TerritorySpain
CityValencia
Period20/01/1023/01/10

Keywords

  • Alzheimer
  • Bump
  • EEG
  • Local synchrony
  • Time-frequency

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