Source localization with EEG data for BP shows major activities in the frontal areas of the brain

Rajkishore Prasad, Hovagim Bakardjian, A. Cichocki, F. Matsuno

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

Abstract

This paper presents results of dipole source localization in the human cortex for EEG data recorded from subjects performing Bhramari Pranayama (BP). It has been suggested that the BP is able to produce neuronal change and thus level of consciousness of the human brain. The EEG signal recorded over the surface of the scalp is the result of the synchronized activities of neurons in the cortex. It is the combination of such neuronal oscillators that results into different spontaneous cognitive activities of the brain. Thus finding the locations of such neuronal sources in the cortex is important and can be performed using source localization techniques. The source identification was performed on band-passed (0-35 Hz and 35Hz to 80 Hz) EEG data for both the pre-BP and BP conditions. The obtained results suggest a symmetric localization of activated sources in the pre-frontal cortex during the BP which indicates a strong, symmetric activation of the higher cognitive functions during an actual BP humming session.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationSICE Annual Conference, SICE 2007
Pages774-778
Number of pages5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007
Externally publishedYes
EventSICE(Society of Instrument and Control Engineers)Annual Conference, SICE 2007 - Takamatsu, Japan
Duration: 17 Sep 200720 Sep 2007

Publication series

NameProceedings of the SICE Annual Conference

Conference

ConferenceSICE(Society of Instrument and Control Engineers)Annual Conference, SICE 2007
Country/TerritoryJapan
CityTakamatsu
Period17/09/0720/09/07

Keywords

  • Breath control
  • EEG
  • Humming sound
  • Pranayama
  • Source localization

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