Effect of protein kinase C activation on cytoskeleton and cation transport in human erythrocytes. Reproduction of some membrane abnormalities revealed in essential hypertension

Y. V. Postnov, G. M. Kravtsov, S. N. Orlov, N. I. Pokudin, I. Y. Postnov, Y. V. Kotelevtsev

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53 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Certain manifestations of alterations of membrane cytoskeleton, protein kinase C activity, and ion transport were revealed in erythrocytes of patients with essential hypertension: 1) the average volume of erythrocytes is reduced by 4%; 2) about 7% of the total number of erythrocytes is represented by cup-shaped forms compared with 1.5 to 3.0% in the control group; 3) basal phosphorylation of Band 4.9 protein is increased 1.6-fold to 1.8-fold; 4) activity of protein kinase C is increased by 60 to 70%; 5) the rate of proton electrochemical gradient (Δμ(H+)-induced Na+-H+ exchange is increased twofold. Treatment of erythrocytes of healthy donors with protein kinase C activator (12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate) leads to similar but more marked changes in cell shape (17% of cup-shaped forms), volume reduction (by 7%), an increase of Band 4.9 protein phosphorylation (threefold), and an increase in the rate of Na+-H+ exchange (fourfold). Protein kinase activation does not modify Na+-Li+ exchange and slightly increases (by 20-50%) Na+-K+ pump activity, Na+-K+ cotransport, and the rate of 45Ca influx. It may be assumed that the increase of protein kinase C activity is one of the most probable molecular mechanisms conditioning abnormalities of the membrane skeleton and Na+-H+ exchange in primary hypertension.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)267-273
Number of pages7
JournalHypertension
Volume12
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1988
Externally publishedYes

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