Dynamical mean-field theory using Wannier functions: A flexible route to electronic structure calculations of strongly correlated materials

F. Lechermann, A. Georges, A. Poteryaev, S. Biermann, M. Posternak, A. Yamasaki, O. K. Andersen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

169 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A versatile method for combining density functional theory in the local density approximation with dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT) is presented. Starting from a general basis-independent formulation, we use Wannier functions as an interface between the two theories. These functions are used for the physical purpose of identifying the correlated orbitals in a specific material, and also for the more technical purpose of interfacing DMFT with different kinds of band-structure methods (with three different techniques being used in the present work). We explore and compare two distinct Wannier schemes, namely the maximally localized Wannier function and the Nth order muffin-tin-orbital methods. Two correlated materials with different degrees of structural and electronic complexity, SrV O3 and BaV S3, are investigated as case studies. SrV O3 belongs to the canonical class of correlated transition-metal oxides, and is chosen here as a test case in view of its simple structure and physical properties. In contrast, the sulfide BaV S3 is known for its rich and complex physics, associated with strong correlation effects and low-dimensional characteristics. Insights into the physics associated with the metal-insulator transition of this compound are provided, particularly regarding correlation-induced modifications of its Fermi surface. Additionally, the necessary formalism for implementing self-consistency over the electronic charge density in a Wannier basis is discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Article number125120
JournalPhysical Review B - Condensed Matter and Materials Physics
Volume74
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006
Externally publishedYes

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