Clinical ethics of the do-not-resuscitate (DNR) order and other advanced directives in anesthesia and ICU

Jack M. Berger, Vladimir Zelman, Holly Muir, Rodolfo Amaya, Ksenia Ershova

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Closed chest cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), having been so successful after its introduction in the operating room for saving lives of anesthetized patients, was adopted for use in the intensive care units, then hospital-wide, and finally to out of hospital patients. This has lead to ethical dilemmas involving patients who must themselves request discontinuation of artificial organ function devices and treatments, or placing family members in the difficult positions of having to make those decisions for their unconscious and suffering relatives. In this review, the Ethical principles on which physicians, hospitals, patients, and surrogate decision makers rely in order to apply their perceived moral obligations to provide patient safety, comfort, and treatment are examined with particular emphasis on do not resuscitate orders (DNR). It is clear that DNR does not equate with do not treat.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)61-74
Number of pages14
JournalObshchaya Reanimatologiya
Volume13
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Advanced directives
  • CPR
  • DNR
  • Ethical principles

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Clinical ethics of the do-not-resuscitate (DNR) order and other advanced directives in anesthesia and ICU'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this