Brain-machine interfaces: An overview

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

51 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) hold promise to treat neurological disabilities by linking intact brain circuitry to assistive devices, such as limb prostheses, wheelchairs, artificial sensors, and computers. BMIs have experienced very rapid development in recent years, facilitated by advances in neural recordings, computer technologies and robots. BMIs are commonly classified into three types: sensory, motor and bidirectional, which subserve motor, sensory and sensorimotor functions, respectively. Additionally, cognitive BMIs have emerged in the domain of higher brain functions. BMIs are also classified as noninvasive or invasive according to the degree of their interference with the biological tissue. Although noninvasive BMIs are safe and easy to implement, their information bandwidth is limited. Invasive BMIs hold promise to improve the bandwidth by utilizing multichannel recordings from ensembles of brain neurons. BMIs have a broad range of clinical goals, as well as the goal to enhance normal brain functions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)99-110
Number of pages12
JournalTranslational Neuroscience
Volume5
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2014
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Brain
  • Decoding
  • Interface
  • Microstimulation
  • Monkey
  • Multielectrode
  • Neuroprosthetic
  • Paralysis
  • Plasticity
  • Robot

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