A human proteome detection and quantitation project

N. Leigh Anderson, Norman G. Anderson, Terry W. Pearson, Christoph H. Borchers, Amanda G. Paulovich, Scott D. Patterson, Michael Gillette, Ruedi Aebersold, Steven A. Carr

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

173 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The lack of sensitive, specific, multiplexage assays for most human proteins is the major technical barrier impeding development of candidate biomarkers into clinically useful tests. Recent progress in mass spectrometry-based assays for proteotypic peptides, particularly those with specific affinity peptide enrichment, offers a systematic and economical path to comprehensive quantitative coverage of the human proteome. A complete suite of assays, e.g. two peptides from the protein product of each of the ∼20,500 human genes (here termed the human Proteome Detection and Quantitation project), would enable rapid and systematic verification of candidate biomarkers and lay a quantitative foundation for subsequent efforts to define the larger universe of splice variants, post-translational modifications, protein-protein interactions, and tissue localization.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)883-886
Number of pages4
JournalMolecular and Cellular Proteomics
Volume8
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2009
Externally publishedYes

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